Definitions

Learn about technical words we use.
Academic equivalency review A review of foreign education courses to compare them to Canadian education standards.
Accredited Something that has been given official approval.
Affidavit A written statement confirmed by oath.
Application checklist The application checklist is a list of everything you need to include with your application package.
Apprenticeship An apprenticeship is formal training that involves a person learning a trade or profession through a combination of on-the-job and in-class training.
Articling Articling is formal training that involves a person learning a profession by working with a highly experienced individaul through a combination of on-the-job and in-class training. Articling is a term often applied to students who are learning to practice law.
Assessment An evaluation of something, such as qualifications, education or experience.
Canadian citizen A Canadian citizen is a person who is Canadian by birth, or who has applied for Canadian citizenship through  Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) and has received a citizenship certificate.
Canadian citizenship certificate The Canadian citizenship certificate is a document issued by Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) that serves as proof of Canadian citizenship.
Certificate A document that is official proof that you have finished school or a course of training.
Certified document A document that has been reviewed and signed by a professional, usually a lawyer or notary public.
Certified translator Someone who has been certified by the Society of Translators and Interpreters to translate documents from one language into another.
Clinical component A part of education that is based on practical work experience, usually in medical occupations.
Clinical exam A clinical exam is based on actual observations, treatments and actions.
Consent Consent means having the permission for something to happen, or the agreement to do something.
Conviction A formal declaration that someone is guilty of a criminal offence.
Credential A qualification or achievement from your background. Examples of credentials include academic diplomas, academic degrees, certifications, security clearances and identification documents.
Criminal record check A police check or criminal record check is an assessment of the record of a person's criminal history.
Declaration A document that contains a formal statement about something.
Designation A formal acknowledgement of qualification presented by a governing body assuring the qualification to perform a job or task.
Diplomate status A person has diplomate status when he/she has received a diploma and has been certified as a specialist by a board of examiners, for example, a doctor or engineer.
Doctorate A doctorate is an academic degree or professional degree that, in most countries, qualifies the holder to teach at the university level in the specific field of his or her degree, or to work in a specific profession.
Eligible To meet requirements. For example, to enter a program a person might need to meet eligibility requirements.
Errors and Omissions Liability Insurance Insurance that protects professionals (such as accountants, architects, brokers, consultant, engineers, lawyers, etc.) against claims arising from their actual or perceived errors, and mistakes in the performance of service for others.
Exemption Freedom from an otherwise required action.
Foreign jurisdiction A foreign jurisdiction is a country or region outside of Canada that has legal boundary and authority.
GED General Educational Diploma or the General Equivalency Diploma (GED) is the process of earning the equivalent of your high school diploma, which is called a GED certificate or credential. 
Governing body A group of people who formulate the policy and direction of an institution.
Guarantor A person who can confirm your identity and the information you have provided.
Interim registration Interim registration means that you are able to legally work in an occupation within specific limits and conditions granted by the occupation's regulatory body, while you complete steps needed to become fully registered.
Jurisdiction The geographic area of authority.
Jurisprudence The study of law as it relates to a specific geographic or professional area.
Letter of reference A reference letter is provided for an applicant by people who are familiar with his or her work or character. The reference letter can be employment-related, or it can speak to the character of the individual.
Licence An official document or card that gives you permission to do, use, or have something.
Licensing authority A licensing authority is an authority or organization that grants licences, (gives permission) to conduct certain actions including working in a profession.
Licensing jurisdiction A licensing jurisdiction is a geographic area (e.g. a state, province or country) that grants licences, (gives permission) to conduct certain actions, including working in a profession.
Mandatory Something that is required.
Moral character An individual's character, traits and qualities.
Mutual recognition Mutual recognition is an agreement between two regulatory bodies to recognize each other's qualifications as equal.
NOC NOC is short for National Occupational Classification. The NOC is a system used by the Government of Canada to classify jobs (occupations). Jobs are grouped based on the type of work a person does and the types of job duties. For more information, visit the NOC website.
Notarized Document A document that a lawyer or notary public has reviewed and signed to certify it is a true copy of an original document.
Permanent resident A permanent resident is someone who has been given permanent resident status by immigrating to Canada, but is not a Canadian citizen. Permanent residents are citizens of other countries.
Personalized checklist A checklist that takes your education and work experience into consideration and provides you with the steps you will need to take to become qualified to work in your profession in B.C.
Practicum A school or college course, especially one in a specialized field of study, which is designed to give students supervised practical experience in a previously studied theory.
Practitioner A person who regularly does an activity that requires specific skill or practice.
Prerequisite Something that is required as a prior condition for something else to happen or exist.
Profession A type of occupation that requires specialized education, training and skill.
Professional liability insurance A form of insurance that helps protect advice and services provided by a professional from the full cost of defending themselves against any claim or lawsuit.
Professional negligence insurance A form of insurance that helps protect services provided by a professional from the full cost of defending themselves against a claim or lawsuit for improperly provided services.
Proficiency test An exam that tests how skilled someone is in a particular activity, field of study, or language.
Provisional Registration Provisional registration means that you are able to legally work in an occupation within specific limits and conditions granted by the occupation's regulatory body, while you complete steps needed to become fully registered.
Qualification A special skill or type of experience or knowledge that makes someone suitable to do a particular job or activity.
Reciprocity The practice of two professional bodies or organizations recognizing each other's membership or certification.
Registered To be formally recorded in a list or directory.
Regulator An organization or government agency that regulates occupational standards and business.
Regulatory body An organization or government agency that regulates occupational standards and business.
Related career A related career is a job that is similar to your trained profession, which you may be able to qualify to work in while you complete steps needed to work in your trained profession.
 Resumé A brief account—one or two pages—of a person’s professional or work experience and qualifications, often submitted with an employment application. A curriculum vitae (CV) is a similar kind of document, but one that summarizes and highlights a person’s academic and/or work experience relevant to a specific job or jobs they are applying for. While a CV contains greater detail than a resumé, CVs are generally also only one or two pages long.
Self-employed To work for yourself rather than for an employer.
Social insurance card A social insurance card includes a person’s name and social insurance number (SIN). A SIN card is issued by the government.
Substantially equivalent Substantially equivalent means that two things have been compared, and have been assessed as being close enough to being equal.
Surety Bond A contract, with a promise to pay a specific amount to another person, if you fail to meet a required obligation.
Syllabus A list of the topics and books that will be studied in a course.
Temporary registration Temporary registration means that you are able to legally work in an occupation within specific limits and conditions granted by the occupation's regulatory body, while you complete steps needed to become fully registered.
Testament Proof or evidence that something exists or is true.
Undergraduate course A class taken at a university or college to gain a bachelor's degree.
Waiver A formal written statement that shows that a party is giving up a right.
Work permit A work permit is an official legal document giving a non-citizen or non-resident of Canada permission to take a temporary job in Canada. For more information, please visit the Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC)